Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction: a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction : a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin. / Bakke, Merete; Baram, Sara; Dalager, Torben; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Møller, Eigild.

In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, Vol. 46, No. 5, 2019, p. 441-449.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Bakke, M, Baram, S, Dalager, T, Biernat, HB & Møller, E 2019, 'Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction: a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin', Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, vol. 46, no. 5, pp. 441-449. https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12768

APA

Bakke, M., Baram, S., Dalager, T., Biernat, H. B., & Møller, E. (2019). Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction: a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 46(5), 441-449. https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12768

Vancouver

Bakke M, Baram S, Dalager T, Biernat HB, Møller E. Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction: a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. 2019;46(5):441-449. https://doi.org/10.1111/joor.12768

Author

Bakke, Merete ; Baram, Sara ; Dalager, Torben ; Biernat, Heidi Bryde ; Møller, Eigild. / Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction : a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin. In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation. 2019 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 441-449.

Bibtex

@article{7b24ebc6b6284e9d9ecc13e64f9b18b0,
title = "Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction: a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin",
abstract = "Background: Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) with involuntary jaw and tongue movements may be misdiagnosed as temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and because of the complex muscle activity and involvement of several small muscles, OMD is also considered difficult to treat.Objectives: The aim was to evaluate OMD in patients 8‐10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin (BoNT) by self‐reported and standardised global scales and questionnaires.Methods: Of 21 previously reported patients with OMD, 14 responded to a mailhealth questionnaire to describe the disease course and treatment effect as well as the overall impact of OMD by a visual analogue scale (VAS), the Patient HealthQuestionnaire (PHQ) for depression and anxiety, and the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS). The results were analysed with non‐parametric statistical analysis (Wilcoxon matched‐pairs test and Spearman’s rank‐order correlations).Results: The OMD was still present in 13 patients. In nine patients, the BoNT treatment had continued as monotherapy or combined with oral medication. VAS for OMD was significantly reduced (P < 0.04) over the years, and most patients felt improvement from the treatment. However, the patients had still some functional limitations, typically regarding jaw mobility and communication, and both JFLS and mental distress (PHQ) were significantly correlated with the OMD VAS (rS 0.77 and 0.74).Conclusion: The results showed marked reduction of the experienced OMD withtreatment and over time, and also stressed similarities between OMD and TMD. Both dentists and neurologists should be aware of this overlap and reduce misdiagnosis by applying an interdisciplinary approach.",
keywords = "Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Patient Health Questionnaire, Jaw Functional Limitation Scale, orofacial dysfunction",
author = "Merete Bakke and Sara Baram and Torben Dalager and Biernat, {Heidi Bryde} and Eigild M{\o}ller",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1111/joor.12768",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "441--449",
journal = "Journal of Oral Rehabilitation",
issn = "0305-182X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oromandibular dystonia, mental distress and oro-facial dysfunction

T2 - a follow-up 8-10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin

AU - Bakke, Merete

AU - Baram, Sara

AU - Dalager, Torben

AU - Biernat, Heidi Bryde

AU - Møller, Eigild

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) with involuntary jaw and tongue movements may be misdiagnosed as temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and because of the complex muscle activity and involvement of several small muscles, OMD is also considered difficult to treat.Objectives: The aim was to evaluate OMD in patients 8‐10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin (BoNT) by self‐reported and standardised global scales and questionnaires.Methods: Of 21 previously reported patients with OMD, 14 responded to a mailhealth questionnaire to describe the disease course and treatment effect as well as the overall impact of OMD by a visual analogue scale (VAS), the Patient HealthQuestionnaire (PHQ) for depression and anxiety, and the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS). The results were analysed with non‐parametric statistical analysis (Wilcoxon matched‐pairs test and Spearman’s rank‐order correlations).Results: The OMD was still present in 13 patients. In nine patients, the BoNT treatment had continued as monotherapy or combined with oral medication. VAS for OMD was significantly reduced (P < 0.04) over the years, and most patients felt improvement from the treatment. However, the patients had still some functional limitations, typically regarding jaw mobility and communication, and both JFLS and mental distress (PHQ) were significantly correlated with the OMD VAS (rS 0.77 and 0.74).Conclusion: The results showed marked reduction of the experienced OMD withtreatment and over time, and also stressed similarities between OMD and TMD. Both dentists and neurologists should be aware of this overlap and reduce misdiagnosis by applying an interdisciplinary approach.

AB - Background: Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) with involuntary jaw and tongue movements may be misdiagnosed as temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and because of the complex muscle activity and involvement of several small muscles, OMD is also considered difficult to treat.Objectives: The aim was to evaluate OMD in patients 8‐10 years after start of treatment with botulinum toxin (BoNT) by self‐reported and standardised global scales and questionnaires.Methods: Of 21 previously reported patients with OMD, 14 responded to a mailhealth questionnaire to describe the disease course and treatment effect as well as the overall impact of OMD by a visual analogue scale (VAS), the Patient HealthQuestionnaire (PHQ) for depression and anxiety, and the Jaw Functional Limitation Scale (JFLS). The results were analysed with non‐parametric statistical analysis (Wilcoxon matched‐pairs test and Spearman’s rank‐order correlations).Results: The OMD was still present in 13 patients. In nine patients, the BoNT treatment had continued as monotherapy or combined with oral medication. VAS for OMD was significantly reduced (P < 0.04) over the years, and most patients felt improvement from the treatment. However, the patients had still some functional limitations, typically regarding jaw mobility and communication, and both JFLS and mental distress (PHQ) were significantly correlated with the OMD VAS (rS 0.77 and 0.74).Conclusion: The results showed marked reduction of the experienced OMD withtreatment and over time, and also stressed similarities between OMD and TMD. Both dentists and neurologists should be aware of this overlap and reduce misdiagnosis by applying an interdisciplinary approach.

KW - Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

KW - Patient Health Questionnaire

KW - Jaw Functional Limitation Scale

KW - orofacial dysfunction

U2 - 10.1111/joor.12768

DO - 10.1111/joor.12768

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30664806

VL - 46

SP - 441

EP - 449

JO - Journal of Oral Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Oral Rehabilitation

SN - 0305-182X

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 203376756