Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level

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Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level. / Davies, Matthew N; Gloriam, David E; Secker, Andrew; Freitas, Alex A.; Timmis, Jon; Flower, Darren R.

In: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, Vol. 11, No. 15, 2011, p. 1994-2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Davies, MN, Gloriam, DE, Secker, A, Freitas, AA, Timmis, J & Flower, DR 2011, 'Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level', Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, vol. 11, no. 15, pp. 1994-2009.

APA

Davies, M. N., Gloriam, D. E., Secker, A., Freitas, A. A., Timmis, J., & Flower, D. R. (2011). Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level. Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry, 11(15), 1994-2009.

Vancouver

Davies MN, Gloriam DE, Secker A, Freitas AA, Timmis J, Flower DR. Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level. Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry. 2011;11(15):1994-2009.

Author

Davies, Matthew N ; Gloriam, David E ; Secker, Andrew ; Freitas, Alex A. ; Timmis, Jon ; Flower, Darren R. / Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level. In: Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 15. pp. 1994-2009.

Bibtex

@article{767f8da8cb4a480686e2adf966a75ae9,
title = "Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level",
abstract = "The G-protein coupled receptors--or GPCRs--comprise simultaneously one of the largest and one of the most multi-functional protein families known to modern-day molecular bioscience. From a drug discovery and pharmaceutical industry perspective, the GPCRs constitute one of the most commercially and economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques to machine learning as well as a variety of alignment-free techniques based on the physiochemical properties of sequences. We review here the available methodologies for the classification of GPCRs. Part of this work focuses on how we have tried to build the intrinsically hierarchical nature of sequence relations, implicit within the family, into an adaptive approach to classification. Importantly, we also allude to some of the key innate problems in developing an effective approach to classifying the GPCRs: the lack of sequence similarity between the six classes that comprise the GPCR family and the low sequence similarity to other family members evinced by many newly revealed members of the family.",
keywords = "Former Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences",
author = "Davies, {Matthew N} and Gloriam, {David E} and Andrew Secker and Freitas, {Alex A.} and Jon Timmis and Flower, {Darren R.}",
note = "Keywords: GPCR; classification; bioinformatics; alignment; tools",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "1994--2009",
journal = "Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry",
issn = "1568-0266",
publisher = "Bentham Science Publishers",
number = "15",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Present perspectives on the automated classification of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the protein sequence level

AU - Davies, Matthew N

AU - Gloriam, David E

AU - Secker, Andrew

AU - Freitas, Alex A.

AU - Timmis, Jon

AU - Flower, Darren R.

N1 - Keywords: GPCR; classification; bioinformatics; alignment; tools

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The G-protein coupled receptors--or GPCRs--comprise simultaneously one of the largest and one of the most multi-functional protein families known to modern-day molecular bioscience. From a drug discovery and pharmaceutical industry perspective, the GPCRs constitute one of the most commercially and economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques to machine learning as well as a variety of alignment-free techniques based on the physiochemical properties of sequences. We review here the available methodologies for the classification of GPCRs. Part of this work focuses on how we have tried to build the intrinsically hierarchical nature of sequence relations, implicit within the family, into an adaptive approach to classification. Importantly, we also allude to some of the key innate problems in developing an effective approach to classifying the GPCRs: the lack of sequence similarity between the six classes that comprise the GPCR family and the low sequence similarity to other family members evinced by many newly revealed members of the family.

AB - The G-protein coupled receptors--or GPCRs--comprise simultaneously one of the largest and one of the most multi-functional protein families known to modern-day molecular bioscience. From a drug discovery and pharmaceutical industry perspective, the GPCRs constitute one of the most commercially and economically important groups of proteins known. The GPCRs undertake numerous vital metabolic functions and interact with a hugely diverse range of small and large ligands. Many different methodologies have been developed to efficiently and accurately classify the GPCRs. These range from motif-based techniques to machine learning as well as a variety of alignment-free techniques based on the physiochemical properties of sequences. We review here the available methodologies for the classification of GPCRs. Part of this work focuses on how we have tried to build the intrinsically hierarchical nature of sequence relations, implicit within the family, into an adaptive approach to classification. Importantly, we also allude to some of the key innate problems in developing an effective approach to classifying the GPCRs: the lack of sequence similarity between the six classes that comprise the GPCR family and the low sequence similarity to other family members evinced by many newly revealed members of the family.

KW - Former Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

M3 - Journal article

VL - 11

SP - 1994

EP - 2009

JO - Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

JF - Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry

SN - 1568-0266

IS - 15

ER -

ID: 35921799