Synergism of diabetic and inflammatory culture conditions on reactivity of isolated small arteries

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearch

Martin Mads Blædel, Harrie C.M. Boonen, Anette Sams Nielsen, Majid Sheykhzade

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the manifestation of atherosclerosis, which has been linked to obesity, the metabolic syndrome (MS) and overt type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Vascular dysfunction has been proposed to precede atherosclerosis, and in addition, a correlation between vascular dysfunction and local vascular inflammation has been suggested.
Aim: This study addresses the involvement of vascular risk factors of MS and T2DM such as elevated glucose, increased insulin levels, as well as selected cytokines on vascular contractile function.
Methods: Small mesenteric resistance arteries isolated from 8 week old male SD rats were cultured for 21 hours in Endothelial Basal Medium (EBM-2) in petri dishes and in the absence or presence of either 30 mM D-glucose, 100 nM insulin, 100 ng/mL TNFa or any combination of these. Contractile reactivity of normalised arteries was then determined by wire myography as a response to cumulatively increasing concentrations of noradrenaline (NA).
Results: 21 hour culture of isolated mesenteric arteries significantly reduced the arteries maximal high potassium-induced contractile reactivity and increased the contractility to noradrenaline slightly. Arteries that had been incubated in the presence of either D-glucose, insulin, or TNFa alone, displayed unchanged sensitivity and max. responses to NA as compared to control conditions (21 hour incubation in EBM-2 only). However, when arteries were incubated in combinations of glucose, insulin or TNF-a, the NA-induced max. responses and sensitivity significantly increased.
Conclusion: These results suggest that the continuous presence of inflammatory cytokines may significantly enhance hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia-induced changes in vascular reactivity of cultured small arteries. An increased vascular inflammatory status might therefore be pivotal for the development of CVD in diabetes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date19 Jan 2011
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 19 Jan 2011
Event3rd Annual meeting Danish Society for Pharmacology - Odense, Denmark
Duration: 19 Jan 201119 Jan 2011

Conference

Conference3rd Annual meeting Danish Society for Pharmacology
CountryDenmark
CityOdense
Period19/01/201119/01/2011

ID: 32336634